Choosing the Right Stroke Rehab Facility

Knowing where to turn for rehabilitation and support after a stroke can be overwhelming, according to expert volunteers from the American Stroke Association, which published its first-ever Guidelines for Stroke Rehabilitation and Recovery for Adults.

Stroke rehabilitation often requires healthcare professionals from several disciplines because a stroke can affect many functions: paralysis and weakness; gross and fine motor skills; speech and language; cognition; vision; and emotions. Yet limited timeframes to find care after discharge can be challenging.

Learn more.

F.A.S.T. Stroke Resources

The letters F.A.S.T. can help you remember what the sudden signs of stroke are. When you spot these signs, you’ll know you need to call 9-1-1 right away to get help.

We need your help reaching out to communities across America to share the fact that since anyone can have a stroke, everyone should be ready to be a Stroke Hero!

View the F.A.S.T. resources below.

Please help spread the word within our communities.

Download the Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T. Infographic.

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Visit the American Stroke Association to learn more about how to spot a stroke F.A.S.T.

How can your environment put you at risk for stroke?

World Stroke Day is Oct. 29th. Help us raise #stroke awareness and make the movement last longer than one day through sharing this video! Find out how the environment in which you live can put you at elevated risk for stroke and learn to spot a stroke F.A.S.T.


What is a Stroke?

While the term is often used, many people wonder, “What is a stroke?” Stroke is a type of cardiovascular disease. It affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood (and oxygen) it needs, so it starts to die.

Types of Stroke
Even those who know what is a stroke may not realize there is more one type. Stroke can be caused either by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain (ischemic strokes) or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain (Hemorrhagic or bleeding strokes).
More information on ASA website

Diagnosis of Stroke
When someone has shown symptoms of a stroke or a TIA (transient ischemic attack), a doctor will gather information and make a diagnosis. A doctor may use many different tests. The ones listed here are just some of the more common options.
More information on ASA website

Impact of stroke
Stroke is the No. 5 cause of death in the United States, behind diseases of the heart and cancer.

Warning Signs Prior to a Stroke
Prior to a stroke, many people experience a TIA (transient ischemic attack). This is a “mini-stroke” or “warning stroke.” TIAs can occur days, weeks or even months before a major stroke. TIAs occur when a blood clot temporarily clogs an artery, and part of the brain doesn’t get the blood it needs. The warning signs are the same as for stroke; but they occur and disappear relatively quickly, usually in less than five minutes.

Unlike a stroke, when a TIA occurs, the blood clot resolves itself and there’s no permanent injury. When a stroke occurs and part of your brain dies from lack of blood flow, the part of the body it controls is affected. Strokes can cause paralysis, affect language and vision, and cause other problems.

Acute and Preventative Treatments of Stroke
Because their mechanisms are different, the treatments for the types of stroke are different.
More information on ASA website

What Are the Effects of Stroke?
The brain is an extremely complex organ that controls various body functions. If a stroke occurs and blood flow can’t reach the region that controls a particular body function, that part of the body won’t work as it should.
More information on ASA website

Stroke Survivor Stories
Read about stroke survivors and their stories. Be inspired by these great examples of the power to end stroke!
More information on ASA website

Stroke Treatments

Medical treatments for stroke work to either open the blockage of a vessel or treat the rupture. Advancements in stroke treatment have greatly improved survival rates. The chances of survival are even better if the stroke is identified and treated immediately. This articles outlines the various ways to hopefully prevent stroke, as well as the treatment options.

Learn more about stroke prevention and treatment.

Understanding Stroke

It is important to understand the risk factors associated with stroke. Some of these risk factors you can’t change, such as age, heredity and race. Yet others are a result of a person’s lifestyle and choices. These risk factors are the ones you may have the ability to change entirely or at least control. This article explains which risk factors are associated with stroke. By understanding what factors may increase your chances of developing a stroke, you can make different choices. Different choices could lead to very different outcomes.

Learn more about the risk factors of stroke.

Stroke Website

Stroke can be devastating disease. It is leading cause of adult disability in the United States. Stroke can be caused either a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain or by a blood vessel rupturing and preventing blood flow to the brain. It is important to know the signs of stroke because the more quickly a patient can receive treatment, the better the patient’s chances are. This site provides you with information that explains the different types of strokes, as well as how stroke affects the brain. Knowledge is power and knowing what the signs of stroke are could save your or a loved one’s life.

Learn more about stroke and its affects on the brain.

How Can You Tell if You’re Having a Stroke?

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A stroke can happen at any time. But would you be able to recognize the warning signs and symptoms? Strokes occur more commonly in people with diabetes, and high blood pressure. People who are obese, elderly, smoke and don’t eat a balanced diet are at a higher risk as well. It is not always easy to identify a stroke, and any lost time without medical attention can lead to irreplaceable effects on the brain.

Learn the F.A.S.T warning signs to identify a stroke and it could save you or someone you love from serious effects of brain damage.

F – Face Dropping
Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven?

A – Arm Weakness
Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S – Speech Difficulty
Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly?

T – Time to call 9-1-1
If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared.

You could also experience these symptoms:

Numbness or weakness
Especially of the face, arm or leg. Because the brain controls different areas of the body, it is common to experience numbness or weakness on one side of the body and not the other.

Confusion
A stroke inhibits the brain from working properly and might cause confusion.

Vision disturbances
You may have trouble seeing out of one or both eyes. Vision may be blurred or impaired.

Loss of balance or coordination
You may feel dizzy and have trouble walking.

Severe headache
You may experience a severe headache with no direct cause.

If you experience any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately.

A stroke affects the brain in one of two ways, by hemorrhage (rupture of a blood vessel and the spilling of blood into brain tissue) or by a ischemia, (blocked blood vessel in the brain causing the brain not to get enough blood, oxygen and nutrients).. Both have the potential for irreversible brain damage if not treated immediately. When a stroke occurs and part of your brain dies from the lack of blood flow, the part of the body it controls is affected. Strokes can cause paralysis, affect language and vision, and cause other serious health problems.

Another kind of stroke-like event is a Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA), or a warning stroke. A TIA is caused by a blockage of a blood vessel to the brain, causing stroke symptoms, but the stroke symptoms are short lived. It is called transient because the stroke symptoms resolve and there is usually no lasting symptoms left over from this event. While people get back to normal, just having a TIA make a person at very high risk for a full blown stroke with lasting symptoms.

Learn more about the warning signs of a stroke and find more information on stroke prevention at heart.org and strokeassociation.org.

Health Lesson – Don’t Miss a Stroke

Call to Action

Learn the warning signs of a stroke—don’t wait to call 9-1-1 F.A.S.T.
“Don’t Miss a Stroke” helps your community members to learn about stroke, the warning signs, and how to act F.A.S.T. when someone is having a stroke. It also reviews steps to help prevent stroke.

English

Presentation
Presentation with presenter notes
Lesson Plan
Resource List
Ambassador Questionnaire (online)
Ambassador Questionnaire (printable)

Spanish

Presentation
Presentation with presenter notes
Lesson Plan
Ambassador Questionnaire (online)
Ambassador Questionnaire (printable)

 

Stroke Warning Signs and Symptoms

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F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. When you can spot the signs, you’ll know that you need to call 9-1-1 for help right away.

Get F.A.S.T. stroke resources

We need your help to reach out to communities across America to share that anyone can have a stroke so everyone should be ready to be a Stroke Hero!

Please help spread the word within our communities.

Download the stroke resources.

stroke_fast2

English  |  Spanish

Visit the American Stroke Association to learn more about how to spot a stroke F.A.S.T.